Two plates of Turkish moussaka
Two plates of Turkish moussaka

Turkish moussaka (Patlıcan musakka)

Delicious and simple midweek dinner!

Turkish cuisine has a lot of variations on the theme of meat, aubergine and tomato. And it’s to their credit – together they’re absolutely delicious. Always! Turkish moussaka is one of my favourite dishes, and one I often make for an extravagant, yet simple, weeknight dinner.

Two plates of Turkish moussaka

The Greek variety may be more famous, but moussaka supposedly originated in Turkey. During Ottoman times, the dish spread far and wide and developed into fairly distinct varieties across the Middle East, Greece and the Balkans.

In my view, both the Turkish and the Arab varieties are far superior to the Greek. What’s more, they’re both easier to make.

What is moussaka?

The common denominator for all moussaka is aubergine and tomato sauce. Sure, some local versions substitute potato or some other vegetable for the aubergine, but mostly it’s all about the aubergine and tomato.

Most variations of moussaka contain meat, but not all. The Arab version, for example, is with chickpeas, and is served both hot and cold. It’s one of my favourite chickpea dishes – watch this space for a recipe soon.

The Turkish version is perhaps the simplest and most rustic. It’s made of roughly equal parts (each cook has her own view of the relative measurements) minced meat, aubergine and tomato. The holy Mediterranean trinity that never fails to impress.

Turkish moussaka on a light blue plate

How to make Turkish moussaka

There are probably as many ways to prepare the Turkish version of moussaka as there are (home) cooks in Turkey.

Most rely heavily on tomato paste, plenty of oil and a little water for the sauce. This works well in Turkey, where both tomato paste and oil of high quality can be easily acquired (though mass-produced less focused on quality are, sadly, becoming ever more prevalent here, too).

In this version, I use less oil and a mixture of tomato paste and chopped tomato. This gives a fresher taste, more suitable to the ingredients available outside Turkey (where tinned chopped tomatoes tend to be good, but tomato paste not so much).

Turkish moussaka on a light blue plate from top down

I like a bit of a chili kick, and have added both Turkish chili paste (acı biber salçası) and red pepper flakes (pul biber, more commonly known as Aleppo pepper). The spiciness of either can vary considerably, so use with care.

If you like, you can also make it completely mild, skipping the chili paste altogether and only adding as much Aleppo pepper as you’re comfortable with. If you can’t get hold of either both, you’ll still get a delicious dinner – though you’ll lose a lot of the flavour that makes the stew characteristically Turkish.

Serve with rice or bulgur and a freshly chopped salad of seasonal vegetables.

Tip! Turkish moussaka is great for making in advance, but make sure to stir very carefully when re-heating. You don’t want to mash those cubes of aubergine! Better still, prepare all the way up until the point where the aubergines are added, store separately and finish the dish just before serving.

Serves 2-3 with side dishes alongside.

Turkish moussaka on a light blue plate

Turkish moussaka (Patlıcan musakka)

Yield: 2-3 portions

Ingredients

  • 4+2 tbsp olive oil
  • 400 g (c. 2 medium-sized) aubergine, partly peeled and cut into 3 cm cubes
  • 1 onion, roughly chopped
  • 2-3 Turkish green peppers (çarlıston biber), chopped, or 1/2 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
  • 400 g minced beef or lamb (or a mixture)
  • 2 Tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 Tbsp Turkish chili paste (acı biber salçası) or 1 roasted and peeled red peppers, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 400 g chopped tomatoes (fresh if in season, tinned if not)
  • 2 tsp Aleppo pepper (pul biber), or to taste
  • small handfull of chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • water
  • salt and pepper

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 230 C (445 F).
  2. Mix the aubergine cubes with 4 Tbsp olive oil and some salt and pepper. Place on a baking sheet. Roast until soft on the outside and golden on the outside, 20-25 minutes or more.
  3. Meanwhile, heat a thick bottomed frying pan over medium/high heat. Brown the meat in 1 Tbsp olive oil, chopping it up roughly as you go (it's best if you leave some bits a little chunky). Set aside.
  4. Lower the heat to medium. Fry the onion and green pepper with a pinch of salt in the remaining 1 Tbsp olive oil (or as much as is needed) until soft but not browned, stirring regularly, 8-10 minutes.
  5. Add the garlic, tomato paste, pepper paste (or roast peppers) and sugar. Fry, stirring constantly, until very fragrant, a minute or two.
  6. Add the meat, tomatoes, pepper flakes and 200 ml water. Mix well. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and leave to simmer until the tomatoes have broken down and the flavours are starting to set, at least 10-15 minutes.
  7. Carefully add the roast aubergine and flat-leaf parsley. Check again if you want to add more salt, pepper or pepper flakes. Continue to simmer until most of the water has evaporated, 5-15 minutes (it should be thicker than on the photo). Don't stir too much, or you'll mash the aubergines. Serve hot.
Vidar Bergum sitting on front porch in front of his house, reading a book and drinking tea with a street cat eating in front

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I’m Vidar. For the past few years, I’ve been exploring the foods of Turkey, the Middle East and beyond from my house in Balat, Istanbul. Let me show you around!

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I’ve published two books on Turkish and Middle Eastern food, available in Norwegian and German.

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15 Responses

  1. Thank you for sharing this recipe! I’m Turkish although I actually prefer the Greek version and always make it that way – but the world would be too boring if we all thought the same way 🙂

    1. Hehe, to each his own I guess. I’d take the Turkish one any day – but I won’t say no to the Greek variety either 😉

  2. Trying this now! Three Questions: 1. Do you add any other seasoning to the meat? 2. How did you keep your eggplant from sticking to the sheet/foil? Do you know if this freezes well?

    Thank you so much for sharing this recipe!

    1. 1. Just what it says in the recipe. 2. You can use baking parchment, but I find this is rarely a problem anyway. I never use foil. I’m afraid I never tried freezing it.

      Hope you enjoyed it!

  3. What a lovely recipe!!!! Can i serve this delicious Moussaka dish with brown rice spaghetti??? If you can let me know…. thanks

  4. Looks good and delicious and not that difficult to scramble even during the week night, so I will give it a go! And thanks for the newsletter!

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